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5 Girls & 7 Boys – Gender and Sex in a Kindergarten Class

On Thursday my attention was drawn to a new part of the daily routine for the girl’s kindergarten class.  As soon as I saw it I knew I had to do something to have it changed.  Today was my first chance.

A simply drawn boy wearing a baseball cap, and holding a bat and ball, coloured blue with the word BOY.  His counterpart in pink with a pretty dress and holding a flower with the word GIRL sits beside him.  Both on the bulletin board next to the calendar, a counting chart, and other simple items used to subtly teach the kindergarten class basic numerical skills.

boy and girl clipart

The teacher touches the head of each student she deems as “boy”, counting as she goes.  “Seven boys.”  The number gets written on the wipe off board under the picture representing “boy”.  She then touches the head of each remaining child, counting.  “Five girls.”  That number gets written on the board too.  An addition sign gets added between them, and everyone counts on their fingers.  “Twelve kids.  Seven boys and five girls makes twelve kids.”

Now, my ideal kindergarten is gender neutral.  At this age there really is no reason at all to discuss “boy” or “girl”, what each means, and how we each fit into societies gender binary – at least not at school.  At the very least, if it can’t be a neutral space, it should be a equal space.  And these disgustingly stereotypical figures are far from that.  If we must count girls and boys, we need to ask the children “Who identifies as a boy?”  Then count the raised hands, marking the result under the word (no picture) BOY.  “Who feels like a girl?”  Then count those raised hands, marking those results under the word GIRL.  But I think we can do better.  Why reinforce a false binary by bring gender into question at all?  After all, there are more than two sexes, more than two genders (and the terms boy and girl can refer to either gender or sex, which just further muddies the water).

Why not ask “Who likes baseball?” and “Who likes football?” and add those two numbers.  Switch it up, and the next day ask “Who likes veggies?” and “Who likes fruit?”.  Every day of the week could be a different pairing of questions.  After all, we don’t need to come up with the same answer every day.  Some kids may vote yes to both, some may not raise their hand at all.  This way we practice our early math skills, learn something interesting about our friends, AND we don’t reinforce any false notions about gender or sex – which have no place in a kindergarten class to begin with.

I spoke to kid kid’s teacher about my concerns today, and I’ll be honest.  I’m not sure she understood my concerns at all.  She thanked me for bringing them to her attention – but it was very much a canned response…  what one could expect from someone who has never really given much thought to their own gender or sexual identity, someone with CIS privilege, who has lived in a very small, heteronormative box, their entire life.  While I don’t hold this against her, it does mean it may be time for a little educating.  Issues of gender and sexual identity are vitally important to the health and safety of our young people (and the adults they will become), and even something as simple as being told they are BOY…  simply drawn with a baseball cap, bat and ball, coloured blue…  can hurt, when that child knows -inside- it’s not right.

I was a failure!

I was a complete and utter failure in school when it came to math (or algebra or whatever you’d like to call it).  In standardized testing I ended up testing in the bottom five percent of our population.  I switch numbers in my head, so when it came to memorizing the multiplication tables I was hooped.  64’s became 46’s, and vise versa.  Later on I’d fail at any concept that I couldn’t visualize.  Provide  me with a way to rectify the equations in a tangible manner and I’d breeze through the chapter.  Otherwise, and generally, I was in way past my ability to stay afloat.  All through school I thought I must be an absolute idiot.  It was hard on my self esteem, and interfered with so much I’d hoped to do or become.  But today I know better.

As an adult, in every day life, I can often figure out number problems faster than my “high honor roll” husband.  He comes to his answers the way the teachers insist one should…  I come to them by means that baffle and confuse anyone who’s ever asked “how did you figure that out so quick?”

Even simple math problems get answered in a way vastly different than we are taught to find the answers.  Today, for example…  I needed to know how much it would be for three items that were $3.50 each.  Easy, right?  $10.50  But the interesting part is how I arrive at that figure.

Most people simply multiply 3.50 by 3…  Me?  Well, I know that three threes is nine, and .50 three times is 1.50…  together they make 10.50.  And be glad that’s an easy one.  LMAO  The way I arrive at correct numerical answers would astound most.

Anyway…  the whole point of this is simply to say that numbers tormented me as a child.  I was taught that I couldn’t do math, that I didn’t have the capacity.  The bottom five percent of society, incapable of even the most basic math skills.  But it wasn’t true.  I just fail at “textbook” math.

Should children be punished because they can’t arrive at an answer the way society insists they arrive at it?  I don’t think so.  There has to be a better way.  Do I have the answer?  Do I have a solution?  Unfortunately no.  But I do know that the way things are is not okay.  The status quo is simply not good enough.  If I am capable of surpassing honor roll math intellect in terms of speed and accuracy than surely there are others who were also failed by the education system – or who ARE being failed by it at this very moment.  Can’t something be done?

 

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