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Lighting Bug and a Vet Visit

I have to say, I’ve never seen a bug come and go so fast.

The girlie and I were reading our nightly chapters and all of a sudden she heaved.  I grabbed a cup that was sitting beside the bed.  She began sweating profusely, and was burning up.  She vomited about two tablespoons worth, and cooled right back down.  Feeling fine again.  The whole thing lasted about six minutes.  Now she’s sleeping soundly  Have you ever heard of some type of bug that is lightening fast like that?  It was just crazy.  I’m very relieved she’s feeling right as rain so quickly…  but jeepers.

As for our other news, the puppies had a vet visit today.  They got their DAPP shot (their one and only shot), were weighed and inspected.  Deedee weighs in at a whopping 2.2 kgs (which is roughly 4.8 pounds) and Alice is a massive 2.5 kg (roughly 5.5 pounds).  Okay, so they are absolutely a perfect size for female Chihuahuas – and right about where I guessed they were.  But still.  They are big compared to the other two – especially Marnie, who may not be itty bitty for a Chihuahua, is pretty darn tiny compared to the rest of them.  In no other breed is size so wide spread.  Can you imagine another where you can show a dog who is 1/3 the size of another both in the same breed?  The vet said they are both in great condition, and was impressed by their temperaments as well.  What can I say, the girls are awesome!

There are certain times when a meet-up is mandatory.

There are certain times, when a person is delivering a certain type of news, when an in person visit should be mandatory.  Sometimes a phone call, text, or FB status update just aren’t appropriate ways to deliver tidings.  In those situations, lunch, coffee, or just an in person chat, should be mandatory.

Bad News

  • If you are delivering news of a break up, do it in person.  It’s uncomfortable, so a meal is not necessary.  Just a quick get in, get out, meeting at a coffee shop works.
  • If you are sharing news about a negative diagnosis or any kind of medical issues, do it in person.  A meal in a quiet restaurant, or take out in your dining room is best.  Food and wine always go a long way in situations like these.
  • If a family member or loved one has suffered a tragedy or passed from this life, if at all possible that’s an in person encounter if I’ve ever come across one.  And this news?  There is no way for this to be good.  Do it at home, where you’ll both feel comfortable going to pieces.

Good News

  • If you want to take your relationship to the next level (be it going steady, moving in, getting married, or what-have-you), that’s an in person conversation.  And it can happen in almost any context and end up pleasant.
  • If you sharing news of your nuptials with individuals who mean a lot to you, but who couldn’t be there (whether you eloped, or just had a tiny service, whatever), totally something you do in person.  Invite the other party out to a nice restaurant.  Food and wine are definitely in order.
  • If you’re having a baby, don’t break that news from a distance.  Head out to a nice brunch spot, share something light and yummy, and toast the new bun in your oven with a nice sparkling flavoured water.  Hugs, and potentially happy tears, will be shared!

So don’t let your sister find out from your Twitter feed that you’re pregnant, don’t tell your son over the phone that you had a private service and got married, don’t break up with someone via your blog, and don’t let your granddaughter find out you have three months to live by way of BBM.  There is just some news that is best delivered in person, whether it’s to share a hug, a toast, or a cry…  Certain news simply demands a meet-up.

As the Sparks would say: “Share and Be a Friend”.

Way to go Dr. Coren!

Way to go Dr. Coren!  If your plan was to have your readers crying by page 13, you did it.  Kudos to you!

Jeepers.

LOL

I’m starting to think this book may be a tough one to get through.

It sounded like the truth and only cleaning up after a disease could justify using such awful smelly stuff to wash the floors and walls.  It was then that I finally began to believe that Skipper was really dead. I turned to the bucket with its malodorous disinfectant solution and began to damp mop every surface of the house that I could reach — no other dog was going to die in that house if I could help it.  I cleaned everything so vigorously that I could barely lift my arms at the end of the day.  That night I fell asleep dreaming of God sitting on a white throne, with Skippy curled up next to his foot.  Skipper was still my dog; he hadn’t run away from me because I wasn’t kind to him.  I was sad, but God was a  good person whom I could trust to take care of my dog until I got to be with him again.

Stanley Coren tells the story so many of us dog people already know.  Be it distemper or parvo or a host of other infectious canine diseases…  we all know too well the feelings that accompany washing down your home, feeling the pain of the life lost the fear of further loses and the hope that you have the power to prevent them.  But, on page thirteen, in the words above, that story comes through the eyes of a boy barely old enough for grade school – an experience I can only begin to fathom.

So, wish me luck getting through the rest.  An enjoyable, albeit emotional, read so far.  😉

Page 13 of Born to Bark by Dr. Stanley Coren

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