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A2Z – Removing Stigma while Reintegrating Socially

Blogging our way from A to Z on sexual and gender identity - Removing Stigma while Reintegrating Socially

So yeah…  it’s Friday, and here I am… blogging.  I know, I know.  I don’t blog on Fridays.  But I’m breaking my rule tonight with a double letter post.  That’s right, here we are with R and S…  and all so that T will fall on the 21st.  LMAO  Not sure why that’s important?  Well, just make sure you come back tomorrow.  😉  Now, onto Removing Stigma while Reintegrating Socially!

I’ll admit, I’ve never had to come out to my family and friends as being a different sex or gender than I was assigned with at birth.  For that?  I feel very blessed.  I can only imagine how difficult it would be, and how brave you would have to be.  Coming out to yourself, and finding who you are when it doesn’t match who you’ve been told you are takes courage, but then going even further and coming out to everyone who knew the OLD you?  That takes big freakin’ brass balls.  And I have SOOO much respect and admiration for all of my Trans brothers and sisters.  It’s hard enough to live authentically in our world, but to live authentically when you face that type of obstacle?  It takes someone who is amazing: amazing, incredible, and fierce!

After all that?  Well, the good news?  Stigma just falls away when you get to that point.  When you are ready to take your life back and live for YOURSELF?  Your TRUE self?  Then anyone who matters will be so in awe of everything you went through to get there that the only thing there will be LOADS of freakin’ respect.

No, that doesn’t mean it will be all roses.  There are going to be asses in your life that will make things hard, and they may even make you question everything you’ve lived through up until that point…  but cling to the fact that you are amazing, and that you DESERVE to be yourself.  You have a right to live the truth, to be who you are, and to do so surrounded by people who get just how long of a journey authenticity can be.  So forget the h8rs, you don’t need them, and be gentle with those who are trying (but may occasionally misuse a pronoun or old name) they’re worth the reminders.  It won’t be easy, but once you get there it is SOOO worth it.

Nothing but love!

And know you aren’t alone.  If you are in Saskatchewan, check out TransSask at http://www.transsask.org/ and if not, check out some of the resources listed in my A2Z Community post.  Building a community of people who love and support you is one of the best things you can do for yourself!

Free to do it again and again

A warning before I begin:

This blog post may be triggering for some as it contains mentions of sexual abuse and physical attacks by a predator.  Please don’t read any further if these are topics which may cause mental anguish, flashbacks, or disassociative spells.

Today there was an article in the paper entitled “Repeat sex offender fits ‘dangerous’ designation“.  It is about a man named Cameron Downs, a 47 year old man with a lifetime of attacks under his belt.  But for me, it was about a teenage boy who abused me and went on to hurt many, many others.

Why share?  Sexual abuse, like mental illness has a stigma in our society – and it shouldn’t.  I don’t live my life as a victim.  I was harmed as a child, but that doesn’t take away from who I am, nor does it solely shape my identity.  Feeling that I should be ashamed, I’ve hidden away these facts, careful not to share them in case it might colour what people think of me.  But you know what?  That only adds to the power of the abuse.  I wasn’t to blame, and while I was a victim as a child, I am not any longer.  I refuse to allow societies shame to be my own.  If we don’t talk about these kinds of things, it allows them to happen again.  It feeds into the idea that they, the victims, should hide away and not be seen.  So I’m pulling back the curtain and letting in some light.

I run a Facebook group for people who grew up during the 60’s, 70’s, and 80’s in our Saskatoon neighbourhood.  When my mom shared the news story that ran today, shock resonated through the group.  A few individuals posted about what a nice guy he was, and how they couldn’t believe he was capable of the atrocities the news story mentioned.

I couldn’t help but speak up, saying only that he was not a nice guy – ever.  One person even tried to correct me, saying that he was a nice guy when they knew him.  But no.  He really wasn’t.

I was five years old.  FIVE.  My daughter is four and a half, and it makes me shudder to my very core to think there are people who would look at her the way he looked at me.  He was 17.

Back then, like all children, I believed that people were innately good.  And that all people deserved second chances.  So when the police officer asked me what I wanted to have happen to Cameron I said that I just wanted him to get help.  We didn’t press charges, and Cameron went into counseling.

Now, knowing the string of incidents that followed, I can’t help but feel remorse.  I know I am not responsible for all those he hurt after me – including someone else I love very dearly (the “elderly woman” the article mentions in the last paragraph).  But I can’t help but wonder if I could have prevented some of what happened if I had pushed for a harsher punishment.

I am not mentioned in the article.  It claims his first sexual assault occurred against a teenager when he was 31.  But it didn’t.  It occurred against a five year old girl, when he was 17 and my Gramma stepped out to buy groceries…

30 years have passed, and when I think back to what happened there is so much I can picture with crystal clarity – and other things I’ve blocked out almost entirely.  It was at that age that I became a pro at disassociating.

I still believe that people have a basic goodness within them, but I also believe we have within us the potential for horrible atrocities.  We are none of us purely good and none of us purely evil.  I don’t know if I did the right thing by choosing not to press charges…  but it was the right thing for me, at the time.  I needed to be able to believe that people, even someone as obviously sick as Cameron, were deserving of second chances.  But it was by my hand that he was free.  Free to do it again, and again.  And for that?  For that I will always have regret.

The StarPhoenix Online:  http://www.thestarphoenix.com/news/Repeat+offender+fits+dangerous+designation/6268079/story.html

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